Category Archives: SMC In the Media

Netflix expected to be Emmy Awards story of the year

For the first time, a series that transcends traditional networks and cable television will win the Emmy for Drama Series, prophesizes Jim McKairnes, the Verizon Chair for Global Broadband and Telecommunications at the Temple University School of Media and Communication.

The headlines following the Sept. 22 awards will scream that television has changed forever after Netflix and House of Cards take some of the top prizes, the former CBS programming executive says. But it will happen, in part, because Emmy voters tend to support the best storyline for their craft.

While McKairnes lauds the quality of House of Cards, … Read more »

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Prof. Culver: iPads can open doors for L.A. students

The Los Angeles Unified School District is in the process of distributing iPads to each of its 650,000 students this year, at a cost of $1 billion.

Sherri Hope Culver, assistant professor of media studies and production and director of the Center for Media and Information Literacy, warns that the technology alone isn’t going to assist in the education of the students.

“Using an iPad just to say you’re using an iPad won’t help students. But using an iPad to open the door to new methods of individualized instruction and student expression is an exciting development in education,” she … Read more »

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MSP prof discusses new era of cinematic TV

More and more television series are embracing the 16-by-9 ratio of the flat screen televisions that are becoming commonplace in American living rooms. Shows such as Game of Thrones, Mad Men and American Horror Story feature stunning visuals traditionally reserved for the movie screen.

“It’s a good time to be in television. It really is replacing the cinema, [which is] losing ticket sales every year.” Temple University School of Media and Communication’s Kristine Weatherston said. “There’s a real need for . . . real creativity to counter the taped garbage that is generated by reality TV.”

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MSP prof discusses new era of cinematic TV

More and more television series are embracing the 16-by-9 ratio of the flat screen televisions that are becoming commonplace in American living rooms. Shows such as Game of Thrones, Mad Men and American Horror Story feature stunning visuals traditionally reserved for the movie screen.

“It’s a good time to be in television. It really is replacing the cinema, [which is] losing ticket sales every year.” Temple University School of Media and Communication’s Kristine Weatherston said. “There’s a real need for . . . real creativity to counter the taped garbage that is generated by reality TV.”

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CJR asks journalism prof why women’s issues end up in the Style section

In a Columbia Journalism Review article, Sarah Jaffe, JOUR ’09, discusses the placement of women’s issues and why they sometimes end up in the Style section.

It helps to look at the history of the Style section, says Journalism Professor Carolyn Kitch. In the 1890s, New York World published the first “Women’s Page,” the forerunner of the Style section. There, newspapers covered food, fashion, parenting and the beginnings of the women’s movement.

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Journalism’s Prof. Harper analyzes media accuracy in Washington Times piece

In the days since it was revealed that Notre Dame football player Manti T’eo’s girlfriend never actually existed, along with a few other factual speed bumps in other news items, journalists have had time to reflect on the importance in accuracy in reporting.

“Each example here undermines the credibility of all journalists. That’s about the only significant aspect for a journalist’s reputation. And the public ranks journalists as among the least credible people in the U.S.,” Harper says.

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