Mobile broadcasting truck visits Temple’s campus

Dan Griffin, Solid State Logic sales support engineer, talks shop with some students inside the truck.
Dan Griffin, Solid State Logic sales support engineer, talks shop with some students inside the truck. (by Betsy Manning/Temple University)

Students interested in a career in music and sound broadcasting gathered into a tiny, yet luxurious, mobile broadcast truck Oct. 24 to check out some of the field’s latest equipment.

Parked outside of Annenberg Hall on a sunny fall afternoon, students from the Temple University School of Media and Communication and the Art Institute of Philadelphia climbed aboard Solid State Logic’s demo truck, which makes 15 to 20 stops around the United States each month.

“This is the kind of truck that would be parked in back of the Kimmel Center and actually used in the field for something like a concert telecast,” said Jack Klotz Jr., associate professor of media studies and production.

According to Dan Griffin, Solid State Logic sales support engineer, “We like to show students and talk about the broadcast industry,” which, he said, has plenty of job opportunities for young people.

For those technically inclined, the truck features SSL’s C-10 HD Plus which has 160 channels, making it, in SSL’s words, “the world’s most powerful compact digital broadcast console.” It also features a few luxury items that are not typical of a broadcast truck.

“You probably won’t find an espresso machine,” Griffin said of one of the demo truck’s added perks.

The truck was parked outside of Annenberg Hall for students interested in music and sound broadcasting.
The truck was parked outside of Annenberg Hall for students interested in music and sound broadcasting. (by Betsy Manning/Temple University)

John Thomas, a junior media studies and production major, was excited to see the truck and all of its features.

“This is the first line of exposure,” Thomas said. “It’s cool to be able to see how it all works in real life.”

During his demonstration, Griffin briefly discussed what it takes to work in the sound industry, especially during a live show.

“You can’t zone out when you’re mixing sound,” Griffin said. “You’re being paid to be observant.”

Michael Geary, one of several students from the Art Institute of Philadelphia who made the trek up Broad Street to visit the truck, thought the presentation was inspiring.

“I graduate in March, so this gives me hope that there is a potential for a job in the field out there for this,” Geary said.

by Logan Beck
SMC Communications


Advertising program featured by major industry organization

The Advertising Department at Temple University’s School of Media and Communication was profiled by the Art Directors Club, a global organization dedicated to the promotion of the creative side of advertising and design, as part of ADC Education Month in October 2014.

The organization touted the program as “the only university-level advertising program to offer formal concentrations in art direction, copywriting, account management and research.”

Read ADC’s interview with Kathy Mueller, assistant professor of advertising.