Study Away

Dublin Courses

Students and Classes

The student population of Temple Dublin is small in number. Our typical student is a sophomore, junior or senior from a college in the United States with an academic background in media, communications, film, theater as well as students majoring in the College of Liberal Arts, the Fox School of Business, the College of Science and Technology, the Tyler School of Art, the Boyer College of Music and Dance , the College of Education, amongst others, and will have no trouble taking the media and communications courses we offer in Dublin during the summer.  Temple students who successfully complete (with a C- or better) the courses on this program will satisfy the Global/World Society requirement. Please note that you do not earn an additional three credits, but the requirement is waived as completed.

The School of Media and Communication is offering a new International Communication Concentration to SMC majors and most of the courses on the Dublin program can be used to fulfill requirements for this concentration.  More information on the International Communication Concentration can be found on the undergraduate bulletin here.  If you are interested in declaring this concentration, you must have already declared a major within the School of Media and Communication, be in good academic standing and complete this form and return it to the Advising Center in Room 9 in Annenberg Hall.  You should also consider making an appointment with an academic advisor prior to declaring the concentration to go over your academic progress.

The IES Abroad Dublin Center occupies a red-brick Victorian building that was originally a post office and has been completely renovated. The Center is walking distance from St. Stephen’s Green and Trinity College.

Features include:

  • High-speed Internet, printer, photocopier and scanner access
  • A student lounge with study desks
  • Classrooms and a small library

One course, Travel Writing, is taught by the Temple Dublin faculty director who is a full-time faculty member in the School of Media and Communication.  The other course, Irish Communal Identity, is taught by an Irish professor with extensive knowledge of all that Dublin has to offer.  From this Irish expert you will have the opportunity explore Dublin and understand all that it has to offer – the good, the bad, the ugly and even the unexpected!  Most summers, this course is taught by the infamous Darren Kelly, an Irish legend in his own right with quite the following amongst Temple students.

Temple students who successfully complete this program automatically satisfy the World Society (GG) requirement of GenEd.  Please note that you do not earn three credits, but the requirement is waived as completed.  The School of Media and Communication is offering a new International Communication Concentration to SMC majors and both of the courses on the Dublin program can be used to fulfill requirements for this concentration.  More information on the International Communication Concentration can be found on the undergraduate bulletin here.  If you are interested in declaring this concentration, you must have already declared a major within the School of Media and Communication, be in good academic standing and complete this form and return it to the Advising Center in Room 9 in Annenberg Hall.  You should also consider making an appointment with an academic advisor prior to declaring the concentration to go over your academic progress.

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer study in Dublin is tailored to your interests, your specialization.   As a vital part of the expansion of your specialized learning and writing, you’ll experience all the intimacy, joy, friendliness, and richness of a youth-oriented, vibrant city, Dublin, and a country that for many of us as Americans, lives deep in our national souls, Ireland.  One of the goals is for all of that to come through your pens and keyboards.

Travel Writing: Contemporary Applications for Irish Storytelling: MSP 3296 or JOURN 3296 (WI 3. s.h.)

Much has been said about the tradition of storytelling in Ireland. However, storytelling is more than a way of preserving culture or providing entertainment. This course will explore the professional applications of storytelling, from crafting a personal creation myth to be used in interviews and presentations to learning how to harness narrative tools for a career in journalism, advertising, film/video production, and more. We all need to be part writer/part performer/part editor and the narrative tools explored in this course will improve your ability to connect with an audience, no matter how that audience is defined. Assignments and activities will include spoken, written and digital storytelling and will expose the students to the people and places of Dublin and its surroundings.

Irish Communal Identity: MSP 4571; FMA 3680; or JOURN 3751 (3 s.h.)

Cultural Geography is the analysis of the relationship between social construction and its spatial expression. Over time Dublin has changed in many ways – politically, culturally, physically and economically. Although some of these shifting landscapes can be referenced on the tourist maps today, examples being Christchurch Cathedral and Georgian Dublin, many of the lived spaces have been forgotten or veiled in the margins. This course enables students to engage in a spatial narrative with the city by means of a detailed study of the city’s spatial morphology in which a form of ‘philosophical pluralism’ is called for in the individual’s ‘human geography’. The tool to be used is ‘geographical imagination’ whereby the sensitivity towards the significance of place, space, and landscape in the constitution and conduct of social life is fostered and expressed spatially. Literature and music will be used to give meaning and identity to the lived environments. The course will explore the ‘hidden’ city spaces within Dublin, those place that house the unemployed, travelers and immigrant communities.

To learn more about the academic component for this course, take a look at three students’ final projects from the Summer 2012 program.  Their projects will give you a better idea about the type of Irish culture areas are explored in the course.  The projects are available here.

The Summer 2013 students produced a culture blog as they each explored all that the Dublin arts scene had to offer!  Check it out here.

The 2014 Faculty Director

Joe Glennon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Advertising. Prior to joining Temple in 2010, Joe was an advertising copywriter and creative director, using the power of story to help brands like Coca-Cola, Microsoft and Benjamin Moore Paints connect to their audiences. He began his professional writing career as a screenwriter in Los Angeles, working with the producers of some of America’s favorite TV comedies. He was born in Boston to an Irish family exposing him to the power of a good story from his earliest days.

APPLICATION materials

RELATED LINKS

CONTACT

  • Katie Ryan
  • Assistant Director
  • Study Away Programs
  • Room 6 Annenberg Hall
  • Phone: 215-204-2677
  • Fax: 215-204-6641
  • Email: smcsa@temple.edu
  • Lezlie McCabe
  • Associate Director
  • Study Away Programs
  • Room 6 Annenberg Hall
  • Phone: 215-204-6535
  • Fax: 215-204-6641
  • Email: smcsa@temple.edu